Archive for October 2013

SECOND C2C PRACTICAL EXERCISE

SECOND C2C PRACTICAL EXERCISE

In the “C2C Update” article above, the first Practical Exercise which will actually pair up Shepherds and serving Chaplains who are in the C4 Advanced Course was mentioned.  The second C2C Practical Exercise was also mentioned.  This exercise will be different because it will occur at an installation monthly UMT Meeting.  We will choose a specific installation.  The Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants attending the Monthly UMT Meeting will be given the contact information of Shepherds and Elders.  They will be responsible for making contact with their assigned Shepherd or Elder and the mentoring process will begin between the paired individuals.  There will not be a prescribed method for communication.  Email, phone calls, blogs, Twitter, Facebook is all possible.  If the Shepherd or Elder is near an installation where their mentee is assigned, personal face-to-face meetings over a cup of coffee, etc. will also be appropriate.  It will be up to the mentee and the Shepherd or Elder to determine the best way to communicate.

NEED C2C Volunteers

NEED C2C Volunteers

We will be conducting the first practical exercise for the Shepherds and Elders in the C2C Program in November (dates to be determined). See the above article “C2C Update.”  If the first two practical exercise were to be conducted today we would have only 1/3 of the Shepherds we need and 1/10 the number of Elders we would need.   All of you know what a great opportunity this is to provide support, encouragement, and support  for our serving Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants and our DREs.   If you haven’t signed up, please do so immediately.  It’s easy!  Go to our Regimental Website, click on the C2C page at the top of the home page, complete the registration form and you become a Shepherd or Elder.  www.chaplainregiment.org

Maybe you can do one more thing that will help to grow our numbers.  Talk to three or more of your chaplain or chaplain assistant friends and encourage them to join.  You can explain how easy it is for them to register and, more importantly, give them an opportunity to serve and support our Chaplain Corps.  Our serving Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants need your support.

SECOND C2C PRACTICAL EXERCISE

In the “C2C Update” article above, the first Practical Exercise which will actually pair up Shepherds and serving Chaplains who are in the C4 Advanced Course was mentioned.  The second C2C Practical Exercise was also mentioned.  This exercise will be different because it will occur at an installation monthly UMT Meeting.  We will choose a specific installation.  The Chaplains and Chaplain Assistants attending the Monthly UMT Meeting will be given the contact information of Shepherds and Elders.  They will be responsible for making contact with their assigned Shepherd or Elder and the mentoring process will begin between the paired individuals.  There will not be a prescribed method for communication.  Email, phone calls, blogs, Twitter, Facebook is all possible.  If the Shepherd or Elder is near an installation where their mentee is assigned, personal face-to-face meetings over a cup of coffee, etc. will also be appropriate.  It will be up to the mentee and the Shepherd or Elder to determine the best way to communicate.

C2C UPDATE October 2013

C2C UPDATE

The C2C (Care to the Caregiver Program) Campaign is progressing, but not as quickly as we would like to see it.  Most of you became Shepherds and Elders two or three months ago and are wondering what is happening and wanting to know when we will actually engage in the program.  We are only one facet of a multi-functional program that is designed to enhance the resiliency of the US Army Chaplain Corps.  The Chief of Chaplains is trying to move all of the parts along at the same speed which requires major coordination.  You can click on the link below to see the briefing slides for the C2C Campaign Plan.

The responsibility of the program will ultimately belong to the Center for Spiritual Leadership (CSL) at the US Army Chaplain Center and School (USACHCS).   The Chief of Chaplains will remain the overseer of the program.  The transition from OCCH to CSL has begun and our first active engagement for Shepherds will take place in November.  The specific date is yet to be determined.  The Chief of Chaplains is calling this our first “practical exercise.”  The names and contact information of the registered Shepherds will be provided to individuals in the present C4 Chaplains Advanced Course.  We will let you know when the specific date is established so you can make arrangements to be available on that date.  It will then be the responsibility of the Shepherds and serving Chaplains to maintain the contact and determined their preferred method of communication.  The same process will take place with Elders and the ANOC students at a later date.  If you have any questions, call me at 571-214-1463 or email at agunhus@aol.com .   GT Gunhus

A note from the President of US Army Chaplain Corps Regimental Association

A note from the President of US Army Chaplain Corps Regimental Association

Dear Chaplain Family,

I have been involved as founding co-director of the Soul Repair Center at Brite Divinity School in Fort Worth Texas. We do research and training on Moral Injury after War under a $650.000 grant from the Lilly Foundation. Last week Rita Nakashima Brock, my founding co-director and I did a workshop at Union Theological Seminary, near Riverside Church and Columbia University Teachers College (121st and Broadway) in New York City. We had sixty-two attendees for various communities concerned about our returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. It was a wonderful, emotional and healing time for veterans and those who care for them in many different programs. We had many clinical professional from the VA; reserve and active duty chaplains; representatives of religious communities wanting to help veterans; academicians from Universities and Seminaries; and Non-Governmental Organizations pledged to help veteran coming home from war; and mental health professionals. We are grateful for the support for the continuing education department of Union Theological Seminary for organizing and sponsoring this seminar.

Some of the outstanding results of this and other seminars we have provided in our effort to educate the public on Moral Injury are these:

  • Moral Injury after War resonates intuitively with people who attend our seminars. People acknowledge that going to war has moral consequences for those who participate and not only those who experience combat.
  • People seem willing to help our veterans’ transition from the closed community (the total Institutional society) to the civilian community. One Maine Captain said “War is not hell; it is the portal to hell, coming home is hell.”
  • The institution of the Military Chaplaincy, with the protection of privileged communication, coupled with the fear of the mental health care in the military to stigmatize, makes our veterans seek out persons of high moral values, empathic understanding, non-judgmental warmth and positive regard for the veterans as worthy of care and respect. I salute all our active duty and active reserves for creating this trust in our veterans.
  • That our religious institutions and employers who value their work force and not as instruments for capital gain are the institutions most capable of bringing our veterans all the way home; integrated, valued and healed combatants from the horror of war.
  • The opportunity of the religious communities to once again have a voice in the care and cure of the soul – a holistic, coordinated treatment for our veterans.

Rita and I conducted a worship service in the historic Judson Memorial Church on Sunday using John 5: 1-15 with me focusing on Jesus question “Do you want to be made well?” and the man’s response, “I have no one to help me so I never make it in first when the water is stirred.” Rita focused on the fact that no one had helped this man for a long time and the work she has done at San Quinton. It was a wonderful worship experience.

We walked to the monument at ground zero, impressive and humbling. I had not been to that site, since I represented the United States of America at a United Nations Prayer for Peace International Clergy Day of Prayer, held ten days after 9-11. The mood at the memorial was sober, solemn, respectful, but tears were still being shed and broken hearts for lost family and friends was still evident. But, what I felt most was the sense of vulnerability. “When the wrong seems oft so strong, God is still of rock and stronghold.

I do not know if we as a corps of chaplains have any deep appreciation of our impact in the lives of the people and the nation we serve. God bless you all and thank you for your servant leadership in our Army, as Chaplains, Chaplain Assistance, and Religious educators.

 

CH (Col) Herman Keizer, Jr. US Army retired.

Care to Caregiver Campaign (C2C) – a message to Shepherds and Elders

Chaplain (Major General) Donald Rutherford, U.S. Army Chief of Chaplains, and former U.S. Army Chief of Chaplains, retired U.S. Army Major General G. T. Gunhus, share a message of thanks to the Shepherds and Elders in the Care to Caregiver campaign. The Care to Caregiver (C2C) campaign is the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps’ branch-wide initiative in support of the U.S. Army’s Ready and Resilient Campaign. The C2C campaign coordinates with former Army Chaplains in order to teach, coach, counsel and mentor our current U.S. Army Chaplains.

Classic Hymns of Christendom by Chaplain Jim Shaw

I was asked to write a few paragraphs relative to what prompted me to write

Classic Hymns of Christendom.  From a teenager I have loved these great hymns, and singing in a superb a cappella choir conducted by our pastor and former director of our St. Louis seminary choir furthered this love.  When I became a pastor and then a chaplain I often had a devotional service (distinguished from a more formal Sunday service) based on such hymns.  The devotional service started with a short story on the author-and if known-why he or she wrote the hymn.  The devotion was based on the Scripture which inspired the phrases in the hymn.  The stanzas in the hymn were sung during the devotion.

When I did this as a protestant chaplain on cruises, some passengers strongly encouraged me to write a book using this model.
  I let the suggestion slide for several years.

Then in 2007 I was asked by our Director of Christian Education at Faith Lutheran Church, Georgetown, TX, the fine congregation which I attend, to teach a twelve week adult class on hymns of Christendom.   I enjoyed putting the course together.  When it was completed I was asked to teach another series and did.  When that was finished it seemed prudent to embark on a book with 52 hymns-one for each week of the year.  All together it took some two years to write.  Concordia Publishing House (CPH) offered to print it; then decided to break it into a book about the authors and a CD-ROM with the Scripture behind the phrases written as a leader’s guide, followed by a student’s guide.  From my perspective this was not a good idea; there are many books on hymnists but none on the Scripture which influenced them.  We went our separate ways and CPH gave me the right to obtain another publisher.

Several publishers offered to print it; I went with CrossLink Ministeries which publishes 25 evangelical books a year.  The project was a four year task:  two years in writing and two in acquiring pictures of the hymnists, completing copy editorial work, obtaining a fine artist for the cover and three artistic renditions of authors without pictures, and the final edition and publishing. In today’s world, I was surprised to discover that authors are also involved in marketing (I’m not wild about this, but now have a web-site, classichymnsofchristendom.com).  From my perspective the four year project was well worth it; the vast majority of the book is Scripture through which God’s Holy Spirit touches lives.  My prayer is that the book will do this and make the hymns even more rewarding.

Chaplain Jim Shaw

 

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Classic Christian hymns affirm and proclaim eternal truths. This book furthers an appreciation of how God’s Word serves as the foundation for the hymns of the Church which have stood the test of time and are loved by many. It highlights the Scriptures which inspired the poets and hymnists–making their hymns even more personally meaningful and spiritually rewarding. The book has multiple uses: personal devotions; leader’s guide; reproducible student’s guide; material to assist clergy with sermons, retreats, group devotions and to help choir/music directors with per-rehearsal devotions.

Chaplain (LTC) Karen Diefendorf

Please pray for Chaplain (LTC) Karen Diefendorf as she under goes surgery on a lung. A needle biopsy done last week was inconclusive, so the doctors will do additional tests during surgery this morning. If it is cancerous, the lower lobe of her lung will be removed. Karen has faithfully served God and country as an Army chaplain (LTC) and is totally secure in the arms of the Father. Remember also her family, doctors and care takers….your prayers are so appreciated!